How To Start Writing a Sales Page for Your Coaching Services or Program

guest-abby-kerr
 

Every coach has services to sell. Based on your Right People and business structure, your services could run the gamut from one-to-one private packages, group coaching experiences, live workshops, retreats, and events, or even a digital, self-guided version of work you do with your clients.

I think most coaches — and well, solo-owned business owners period — would agree that it’s a tall order to write a sales page that feels equal in quality to the work you do, sounds like you, and is clear, energizing yet reassuring, and engaging to read. Oh, and the page communicates the value of the offer and proves the price of participation.

You could absolutely hire a copywriter to help you out. When it comes to selling high value or high priced offers (and honestly, which of your offers isn’t high value?), this is a well-justified expense.

But many coaches wisely choose to write their own sales page copy.

Writing a lovely and compelling sales page that turns interested people into coaching clients or program participants is possible. And it doesn’t have to feel like World War III with a blank document.

But it’s not easy. You already know that.

There aren’t 10 simple steps to follow to sales page bliss (and anyone who tries to sell you this solution is full of bunk).

There is a path to start accessing your own ease and flow around writing a sales page for your offers, and I’m going to walk you through it.

Know your people, know your offer, know the value they perceive.

When you know your Right People — your ideal clients — through and through, you can step into their shoes and see your offer through their eyes.

 
First, know what problems or challenges are irking them or keeping them up at night. What problem or set of interrelated problems does THIS specific coaching offer solve for your Right People? When creating an offer, it’s easy to get swept up in the holistic nature of the work and all of the fun and interesting details you have planned (been there!) and lose focus on the very specific problems being addressed. To keep focused on the problems your offer addresses, bullet them out on ONE Post-It note or 3×5-inch notecard. Keep glancing back at these brief notes as you start writing to stay focused.
 
Next, ask yourself, how do your Right People frame this problem? For instance, you might see your coaching work as being about helping post-college aged women get out of stuckness around their personal lives and careers. But they might see your work as being about helping them feel their way into the next leg of their life journey now that the scaffolding of higher education has been removed. Sometimes a subtle shift in looking at the problem can open up huge breakthroughs in your writing process.
 
Then, think about how would they like to be approached with an offer of help to start working through this issue. For instance, do your Right People prefer an audacious, sassy, straight to the point call-out? Do they prefer a soft, nurturing, lyrical posture in your prose? Or, would they light up around language that perfectly balances heart and head? The key here is to understand how your natural writing voice is one your Right People naturally respond to — because you’re the best-fit coach for them at this time in their lives and in your practice.
 
Finally, marry the frame they use on their problem with the tone and style they prefer (note: it should sound like you!) to see how your offer is different from other similar offers out there. When you discern how your offer is different, remarkable, and valuable, you have a starting point for writing. There may be two hypnobirthing coaching workshops out there, but they each may be geared toward totally different types of Right People with different need expressions and delivery preferences.
 
Keep the value of your offer in mind as seen through the eyes of your Right Person client, and engage the tone they’d like to be approached in around solving this issue, and your sales pages will always be off to a strong start.

 
Abby Kerr is Creative Director of The Voice Bureau, a boutique brand voice development and copywriting agency serving solo-owned and small businesses. She is creator of The Voice Values paradigm for branding. Subscribe to her e-letter, Insider Stuff, for your complimentary brand voice self-assessment. Then tweet her to share your Top 3 Voice Values.

Abby lives in the PNW and is a home cook, a dog mom, and a fiction writer.